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  • Is Your Relationship Solid Enough to Survive the Holidays?

    Is Your Relationship Solid Enough to Survive the Holidays?

    Relationships are not easy at the best of times. During the holidays, however, the pressures can increase even further. Spending time with relatives and estranged families, introducing your new beau to other people in your life, meeting (your partner’s) friends, feeling the financial strain of Christmas shopping, cooking and entertaining like there is no tomorrow. The expectations around the festive period are high; you are expected to be joyful and sociable, not to mention a whizz in the kitchen and a perfect host.

    But what if you are just not feeling it? Or, you have other things on you mind that prevent you from relaxing. It would be helpful if, at those times, you were able to share your concerns and feelings with your partner. But the truth is that due to all the busyness and stress, holidays also increase the strain on our romantic relationships.  And, possibly, bring up relationship issues that have not been dealt with yet.

    A Romance Gone Amiss Two Weeks Before Christmas

    Weeks leading to Christmas are a treacherous time for relationships. It’s a time when many people reflect on their lives and either feel satisfied or are left wanting. As a result, many relationships and marriages, especially those already on a downward trajectory, can end in a breakup. According to David McCandless, who analyzed people’s Facebook statuses, two weeks before Christmas are second only to Spring Break in the frequency of breakups.[1] For relationships that are less-solid, Christmas period can be a testing time that either increases the void or brings two people together. But, more established courtships can also feel the holiday strain.

    If you’re in a relationship, you better brace yourself for some potential turmoil leading up to Christmas and New Year. However, the period after the holidays can be bad, too. Sometimes, people can postpone the decision to break up until after the New Year, holiday disappointments spurring the person to finally act on their doubts.[2] The “December dilemma” turns into “January blues”.

    In all honesty, some relationships are not worth saving. However, there are times when people make premature decisions about calling it quits. Then, it would be useful to recognize the stressors and emotions that might have contributed to the hasty decision.

    Avoid Holiday Hazards

    There are certain things you might want to reflect on before making a holiday-influenced decision about your relationship.

    1. Holidays can set the stage for all sorts of negative emotions and tensions, often associated with family conflicts and deep-seated issues.

     

    1. Anxiety, anger, frustration, insecurities, and depression are often experienced by people when faced with the social pressures of holidays.

     

    1. We often tend to sleep less and drink more during the holidays, which can make us feel more on edge or can cloud our decisions.

     

    1. Financial strain and expectations of (expensive) gifts can bring up anxieties and tensions.

     

    1. Under stress, our communication abilities deteriorate, which makes it more difficult to relate to your partner how you feel.

     

    To prepare yourself for all the holiday and family engagements, it might be a good idea to invest in some de-stressing and learn how to manage your thoughts and emotions better. If you recognize the things that make you tense and communicate well with your partner, your relationship is more likely to survive the festive period and beyond.

    At Medvesta Hypnosis Healthcare we offer personalized hypnotherapy sessions that will help you deal with stress-related issues, as well as your negative emotions and thoughts.  We feel that some relationships are worth saving and should not be the victim of Christmas holidays!

     

    [1] David McCandless. Information is beautiful. Retrieved from http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/

     

    [2] Morse, K. A., & Neuberg, S. L. (2004). How do holidays influence relationship processes and outcomes? Examining the instigating and catalytic effects of Valentine’s Day. Personal Relationships, 11(4), 509-527.

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